Promising Practices
Deepen Student
Engagement

Under increasing pressure to focus on tested subjects like English and math, many schools across the country have been forced to cut time allotted for non-tested subjects such as science, social studies, art and music. With an expanded schedule, schools have the opportunity to preserve and even expand time for these subjects, while still devoting sufficient time for English and math. In fact, many successful expanded-time schools place a premium on providing a broad array of learning opportunities in such areas as the arts, foreign languages, hands-on science, business, community service, and leadership. These schools leverage an expanded-school schedule to include time for these classes and activities which expose students to new skills and interests, help make learning relevant, and aim to deepen students' engagement in school. Moreover, by offering students engaging learning opportunities, well-rounded schools may combat the high drop-out rates that plague low-income communities.

Promising Practice 5
In this chapter of Time Well Spent, read about how successful, expanded-time schools use time to provide a well-rounded education for all their students.
Mathew J. Kuss Middle School, Fall River, MA
More time allows schools to provide both rigorous core academics and engaging enrichments. Read about how Kuss Middle School partners with community organizations to expand learning opportunities for their students.
Woodland Hills Academy, Turtle Creek, PA
Woodland Hills has devoted additional time in their daily schedule to more enrichment and interventions for their students. Read about how the school offers an array of electives for students to develop interests outside of tested subjects.
Golder College Prep, Chicago, IL
Golder College Prep uses an expanded school day to prepare their students for the rigors of college, and time outside of the day to expose them to new opportunities. Read about how Golder connects their students to the community and how those students spend their 200 required hours of enrichment.